KIM SANDERS & FRIENDS: GYPSY MADNESS, PERSIAN NIGHTS at CAMELOT

Friday Feb 1st sees the return of Kim Sanders & Friends and their unique style of Balkan Gypsy brass-band madness – and that ain’t all! There will also be Persian dance grooves, aetherial Sufi meditations, Sth African township jive and strange uncategorisable originals. Special guest with the band will be Iranian Kurdish percussionist Mustafa Karami, a master of the dhaf (frame drum). Mustafa also sings and plays oud.

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“We’ve had some Persian tunes in the repertoire for a while – including Persian reggae” says Kim “but this gig will give us a chance to learn a few new grooves. Mustafa and I played together in Davood Tabrizi’s Far Seas last year. Llew Kiek has also played Persian music in Mara! and with Kim in Nakisa, Tansey’s Fancy and various ad hoc ensembles over the years, Peter Kennard is a great frame-drum player, so there should be a lot of things happening”.
There will also be music with a Balkan Gypsy brass band feel. Kim has played with Gypsy musicians in Macedonia and Turkey, so he is quite at home with improvisation in 11/8 and other bent rhythms. “The trick is” says Kim, “not to count. It’s all feel – the grannies in the villages in Macedonia have never heard of 9/8, but they can do the dance OK! And of course, you always get Romani musicians for your wedding – they’re the best! They are the only people who understand that going half-way round the world to play music doesn’t mean you have a big house and a Ferrari by the pool at home. I remember staying with Romani friends in Berovo, Macedonia, and the party started half an hour after we arrived. Even the 10 year-old kids could play…”
The band will be driven along by Sam’s Stylish Sousaphone.

Kim Sanders: ney, kaval, gaida, saxofon
Llew Kiek: bouzouki, baglama
Sam Golding: sousaphone
Peter Kennard: percussion
Mustafa Karami: oud, vocals and percussion

“The enthusiasm and passion of this globetrotter’s music makes the listener get carried away from the first notes” – Rootstown (Belgium)
“Exotic and uplifting world music with a contemporary feel”
– Paul Petran, Producer, Music Deli, ABC Radio National

“Sanders’ skills as an instrumentalist are impressive, far superior to most Western players who make money from the same instruments…(As a composer, his work is) new and genuinely exciting…Great fun, full of ideas and surprises and an artist deserving of greater exposure” – Chris Williams, fROOTS Magazine (UK)

Doors open 7.30pm Show 9pm
Friday 1st February 2013
Camelot Lounge
19 Marrickville Rd (cnr Railway Pde, 2 mins walk from Sydenham station)
Marrickville, NSW
Entry: $25/$20
Wheelchair access
Last show was sold out – be early or book online!
Fully licenced. Pizzas, mezzes, snacks and sorbets available.

To arrange interviews, HiRes photos etc contact Kim at kimzgaida@hotmail.com
For more info http://kimsandersworldmusic.com/ and http://www.camelotlounge.com/

Kim Sanders & Friends Trio at Sea of Sound Festival in Bathurst

Peter Kennard

Don’t forget all you Far Westies: Kim Sanders & Friends Trio (featuring Peter Kennard and Llew Kiek) will be performing at the opening night of the Bathurst Inland Sea of Sound Festival on Tues 16 Oct. See their website for more info: inlandseaofsound.com

KIM SANDERS & FRIENDS at NATIONAL FOLK FESTIVAL

Performance details for Kim Sanders & Friends at the National Folk Festival in Canberra at Easter are as follows:
Friday 22 April, Cat & Fiddle, 5.30pm
Saturday 23 April, Brindabella, 10am
Sunday 24 April, Marquee, 9.30pm

…but check your programme!

Line-up for NFF 2011 is:
Kim Sanders (ney, mey, kaval, gaida, sax)
Llew Kiek (bouzouki, baglama)
Mark Szeto (fretless electric or double bass)
Bobby Singh (tabla)

KIM SANDERS & FRIENDS BROADEN the HORIZONS at the CAMELOT LOUNGE

KIM SANDERS & FRIENDS will follow their stunning gig at Peats Ridge Festival on New Years Eve with a more expansive performance at Camelot in Marrickville on Sunday February 27.

Line-up this time will be

Kim Sanders: ney,kaval, mey, tenor sax

Llew Kiek: bouzouki, baglama, oud

Mark Szeto: double bass

Bobby Singh: tabla

“It’s great playing with such great musicians with such varied backgrounds”,  says Kim.  “It means the music never gets stale.”

Kim Sanders & Friends will hit the stage at 7.30 pm. Second band will be Modern Gong Ritual, kicking off round 9 pm.

Modern Gong Ritual blend ancient and modern instruments as ” untraditionalists ” to create “ambience with attitude”. Featuring guitarists Kent Steedman from the legendary rockers the Celibate Rifles, Michael Trifunovic of  Aqualash and gong-playing sound-scaper David Bullock.

Camelot Lounge

19 Marrickville Rd (cnr Railway Pde)

Marrickville, NSW

7.30 pm

Entry: $25/$20/$15 youth (15 yrs and under)
Camelot is fully licensed (no BYO) and delicious food is available. Drinks are the most reasonably priced in any Sydney venue – no rip-offs here!
Plenty of parking in Railway Pde, or 1 min walk from Sydenham Station

On-line bookings will be up soon. See www.camelotlounge.com

Review of Bent Grooves CD Launch, Sound Lounge, Sydney, 9th May 2008

Such was a celebration of various cultures through regional music, a reflection of the endless pursuit of diversity for Kim Sanders. Whilst performances sharing the theme of diversity have not gone un-acknowledged over the past decade, it felt to me like the shackles of the Howard monoculture had finally been broken during this performance which represented more than just creative music but friendship, inclusiveness, respect and genuine inter-cultural collaboration. Sanders might look like a gypsy with his long greying locks, his Bohemian garb and his goat skin bags but his manner and his dialogue is as Aussie as the next bloke and this fact almost defies the reality of his ability to converse in several languages across the Asian, European and African continents, let alone his ability to foster musical conversations in as many languages using over 14 wind instruments.
Along with Kim Sanders, the core quartet of the ‘Friends’ include Sandy Evans tenor and soprano saxophones, Bobby Singh tabla and Steve Elphick double bass. They opened with Heyamoli a Northern Turkish lament which saw Kim playing Turkish gaida (bagpipe) and Sandy in unison on tenor.
Next they performed the suite A Journey in Saba Makam. The ney is a sufi flute made of bamboo which Sanders freely improvised the first movement Bas Taksim over a singular Elphick drone followed by the additive of Evans and Singh. Such was Evans sensitivity on tenor during the second movement Saba Nefes I that her shadowing was simply an additional tonal flavour of the smokey fluted melody. The final movement showcased the awe-inspiring talent of Singh on tabla.
Sanders who is also a keen surfer, at one time took up the boogie board instead and soon found that serious surfers refer to them as a Speedbump but what commenced as a gypsy jam ended up a Congolese groove thanks mainly to the synchronicity of both Singh and Elphick.
Yet another continent was thrown into the mix with the addition of Chilean Carlos Villanueva and his Andean charango playing the flamenco tinged The Bad Bodgie Bulerias. With an almost clenched fist, Villanueva’s finger nails rapidly raked the repeated four chords of this piece on this instrument of only ukelele dimensions. By now parts of the capacity crowd were shrieking.
Kay Yagar which is interpreted as ‘snow is falling’ was a further showcase of Sanders skills; this time on the double reeded flute, the mey. His circular breathing and tonguing of this instrument created a spellbinding vibrato which preceded his swap to the bagpipes. Another dimension of this piece was the addition of Llew Kiek from the renowned band Mara! on the baglama or Turkish lute.
Istanbul Blues allowed Sandy Evans on tenor a precursor of what was to come on Oi Havar where she simply soared, taking the audience with her on a carpet ride of freedom and joyous expression.
When George Doukas arrived on stage the battle of the bouzouki’s began with Kiek choosing his own richly decorated axe. While Doukas proved a virtuoso, nothing was going to prepare us for the arrival of the final friend Bobby Dimitrievski on clarinet who displayed an agility on the instrument which is rarely witnessed. Following a standing ovation the group finally returned to the stage for a fitting finale. But what was probably the most musically intuitive passage of the performance came after Evans (during her solo) cried to Dimitrievski to ‘join in Bobby’. The result was a lesson to us all in genuine conversation where listening is just as important as speech when the magic of their respective instruments interwove a singular dialect of perfect harmony.
This was nothing less than a triumphant performance by Kim Sanders and Friends

– Peter Wockner, Jazz and Beyond, May 08 (www.jazzandbeyond.com.au)