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 Kim Sanders  1948-2013

 


Kim with Glen Doyle, Solo International Ethnic Music Festival, Indonesia, 2008

Kim with Glen Doyle, Solo International Ethnic Music Festival, Indonesia, 2008

One time cane-cutter, meatworks labourer and documentary film researcher, World Music pioneer Kim Sanders has steamed up the coast of Sumatra in a tramp steamer full of rubber, survived border crossings with Georgian gun runners and been arrested for spying by a Macedonian Brezhnev lookalike. He has played on national radio in Bulgaria and national TV in Indonesia, with Gypsy wedding bands in Macedonia, in mosquito-ridden clubs in Gambia, tavernas in Greece, tea-houses in China and concert-halls from the Ataturk Cultural Centre in Istanbul to the Sydney Opera House.

Gypsy wedding band, Berovo, Macedonia, 1985

With Gypsy wedding band, Berovo, Macedonia, 1984

In ’84/5 Kim spent eighteen months studying and performing in the Balkans, Turkey and Gambia and Senegal in West Africa where he played with the Libidorr Band. In ’93/4 he returned to Turkey and the Balkans and performed with Turkish/Greek group Phanari tis Anatolis (aka Bosphoros or Anadolu Fener), Zimbabwean mbira-player Stella Chiweshe and musicians from the Filip Koutev (Bulgarian State) Ensemble. He performed solo on Radio Sofia and recorded with Phanari tis Anatolis and Turkish singer Oguz Yilmaz.

With Bayang-Bayang, Jogjakarta, Indonesia, 1996

With Sawung Jabo's Bayang-Bayang, Jogjakarta, Indonesia, 1996

In ’96 he toured Indonesia with Sawung Jabo’s innovative music/dance production Bayang-Bayang and returned to Indonesia in 00 and 03 with Indonesian-World group GengGong, in 05 and 07 with Trio Dingo and in 06, 07 and 12 as soloist. He has recorded in Indonesia with GengGong and singers Setiawan Djodi and Oppie Andaresta.

In ’00/01 Kim returned to Turkey to continue his studies in Turkish Classical, Sufi, Gypsy and folk music. He performed with Laz musician Birol Topaloglu and with the Turkish Ministry for Culture’s Istanbul State Modern Folk Music Ensemble. He was the subject of a short documentary on Turkish television. He returned to Turkey in 07/08 and studied with ney master Ahmet Kaya and Gypsy clarinetist Selim Sesler. Amongst others he performed with percussionist Okay Temiz and with the Turkish incarnation of Kim Sanders & Friends.

Performing with Tianchuang at the Jintai Museum, Beijing, 2004

With Tianchuang at Jintai Museum, Beijing, 2004

In 04 he performed in Beijing as a soloist and worked with pioneering Chinese World-Jazz ensemble Tianchuang.

In Australia Kim was co-leader (with Linsey Pollak) of Australia’s first World-Jazz band (Rabadaki, 79) and has since played with musicians from every continent except Antarctica (including Flamenco Dreaming, Nakisa, Okapi Guitar Band, Seaweed & Wire, Chichitote, Davood Tabrizi, Descendance and Balcano). He performed with Zülfü Livaneli and Fatih Kisaparmak (Turkey), Bahar (Iran) and the Bisserov Sisters (Bulgaria) on their Australian tours.

With Birol Topaloglu,  Istanbul 2008

With Birol Topaloglu, Istanbul 2008

In the 90s he lead legendary “Gypsy-Afro- World” band Brassov and worked with Bulgarian folk singer Silvia Entcheva in the Silvia Entcheva Trio.  He also performed in Australia with GengGong and led various ensembles featuring musicians including Indian tabla master Bobby Singh, Macedonian clarinettist Bobby Dimitrievski, Greek singer/bouzouki-player George Doukas and jazz masters Sandy Evans and Toby Hall.

Wedding in The Gambia with Bas Jobarteh, 2005

Wedding in The Gambia with Bas Jobarteh, 1985

Kim plays Macedonian, Turkish and Bulgarian gaidas (bagpipes), aardvark (Australian-Turkish- Bulgarian bass bagpipe); Bulgarian and Turkish kavals (long wooden flutes), saluang (Sumatran flute), furulya (Hungarian flute) and ney (Dervish flute); mey, duduk, guanzi (Turkish, Armenian, Chinese double reed instruments); zurna (Turkish/Balkan shawm); tenor sax; tin whistle; davul (dauli, tapan)(drum) and small percussion. He also arranges ensembles for special events, and composes music for films and stage productions.

Kim also teaches gaida, kaval, mey, ney, duduk and theory.

With Madurese group Semut Merah, East Jave Persussion Festival, 2008

With Madurese group Semut Merah, East Jave Persussion Festival, 2008

“Masterly control of subtlety…very soulful playing” – Diaspora Worldbeat Magazine

“Sanders’ skills as an instrumentalist are impressive… (As a composer, his work is) new and genuinely exciting” – Chris Williams, fROOTS Magazine (UK)

“I will never view animals in quite the same way after seeing Sanders’ inflated menagerie of bagpipes. But it was the saxophone that most warmed the blood: a big, braying honking beast of a thing that could unexpectedly whisper sweet nothings in your ear” – John Shand, Sydney Morning Herald

Recording with Phanari tis Anatolis, Istanbul 1993

Recording with Phanari tis Anatolis, Istanbul 1993

“Virtually a force unto himself in world music scenes” – Drum Media

“…the magical voice of Kim Sanders’ saxophone” – Yogja Pos, Indonesia

“There are no more than a few Australian musicians who have made certain types of folk music their stamping-ground. Multi-instrumentalist Kim Sanders is one” – Australian Financial Review

With Stella Chiweshe, Istanbul 1994

With Stella Chiweshe, Istanbul 1994

“Kim Sanders was particularly effective on Turkish and Macedonian bagpipes, peeling off lines that were both inventive and convincingly idiomatic.” – John Clare, Sydney Morning Herald

“More, more, more!” – Kuranda Seyit, Australian Muslim News

Click here for a downloadable interview with Kim on the Jazz and Beyond Web site

and click here to hear Hans Stoeve of 2SER-FM talking with Kim

To hear some of Kim’s music, and links to videos, see the “Hear the music” page and the “Links” page

For information on some of Kim’s recent gigs see “Gigs and News” page

Because of the spam deluge, “Comments” have been disabled for this website.  If you would like to comment on any aspect of Kim’s musical activities you can do so by email (kimzgaida@hotmail.com) or on the “Kim Sanders World Music” page on Facebook (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kim-Sanders-World-Music/131697043563700?sk=info ).

Kim’s Teachers

Gaida lesson with Lazo Nikolovski in Skopje, Macedonia, 1985

Bas Jobarteh

Bas Jobarteh

Kostadin Varimezov

Kostadin Varimezov

Pece Atanasovski

Pece Atanasovski

Selim Sesler

Selim Sesler

Haydar Tanriverdi

Neyzen Ahmet Kaya

“Despite what some people think, a good teacher can teach you an awful lot. It saves a lot of time if you can start from square 17 instead of square one. Especially since you only live once.

I owe a huge debt to my teachers especially:

Sabahattin Akdagcik, Baran Asik, Pece Atanasovski, Traiche Baldzhiev, Bob Bertles, Salih Bilgin, Sinan Celik, Ilyas Celikoglu, Timucin Cevikoglu, Don Cherry, Destan Destanovski, Georgi Doytchev, Georgi Dzhelyazkov, Kamil Gul,  Ahmet KayaSongul Karahasanoglu,  Kostas Latas, Riley LeeDave Leibman, Ferdi Nadas, Lazo Nikolovski, Linsey Pollak, Ahmet Sahin, Selim Sesler, Haydar Tanriverdi, Omar Faruk Tekbilek, Risto Todoroski, Musa Uzunkaya, Kostadin Varimezov, Ali Yilmaz

…and to those who either inspired me or tought me indirectly, including

Allarakah, Albert Ayler, J.S.Bach, Ginger Baker, The Band, Gato Barbieri, Bela Bartok, The Beatles, The Bechuanaland Boys, Capt Beefheart, Tunji Beier, Sotiria Belou, Ed Blackwell, Blind Blake, Carla Bley, Lester Bowie, Goran Bregovic, Lord Buckley, Ray Charles, Avishai Cohen, Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, Fanta Damba, Miles Davis, Paul Desmond, Eric Dolphy, Don Drummond and the Skatalites, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin, Franco, Saffet Gundeger, Charlie Haden, Thassos Halkias, Coleman Hawkins, Jimi Hendrix, Toots Hibbert, Holiday Billie, Dave Holland, John Lee Hooker, Bobby Hutcherson, Abdullah Ibrahim, Elvin Jones, Louis Jordan, Mustafa Kandirali, Nadya Karadzhova, Salif Keita, Ali Akbar Khan, Bismillah Khan, Lord Kitchener, Mile Kolarov, Aka Gunduz Kutbay, Fela Kuti, J.B. Lenoir, Cachao and Cachaito Lopez, Mac Rebbenac, Taj Mahal, Makhona Zonke Band, Bob Marley, Bernie McGann, Charles Mingus, Zigaboo Modeliste, Thelonious Monk, Mothers of Invention, Ferrus Mustafov, Randy Newman, Tale Ognenovski, Sadrettin Ozcimi, Charlie Parker, Cole Porter, Sun Ra, Esma Redzhevopa, Django Reinhardt, Sam Rivers, Sonny Rollins, Niyazi Sayin, Pete Seeger, Archie Shepp, Igor Stravinsky, Tchico Tchikaya,  Ahmet Tekbilek, Neyzen Tevfik, Dafo Trendafilov, Vasilis Tsitsanis, Ali Farka Toure, Jethro Tull, Stanley Unwin, Asik Veysel, Ben Webster, Howlin Wolf, Lester Young, Frank Zappa

Don Cherry

…to all the musicians I have played with over the years, who have been my teachers also, and to people who have tought me all kinds of things informally. These include

Haydar Kekec, Musa Uzunkaya

Reza Achman, Hossein Allaf, Engin Arslan, Suren Asaduryan, Omer Avci, Epizo Bangoura, Raoul Bassa, Jose Barroso, Rigel Best, Peter Boyd, Mirslav Bukovski, Andy Busuttil, Stella Chiweshe, Sean Choolburra, Masood Davoody,  Destan Destanovski, Bobby Dimitrievski, George Doukas, Glen Doyle, Melda Duygulu, Steve Elphick, Silvia Entcheva, Arif Erdebil, Hasan Esen, Christine Evans, Sandy Evans, Wayne Freer, Faramehr Farnoosh, Blair Greenberg, Robert Guzmanyi, Toby Hall, Marcus Holden, Don Hopkins, Kahanan Inisisri, Ercan Irmak, Ugur Isik, Tevfik Isiktimur, Sawung Jabo, Bas Jobarteh, Inisisri Kahanan, David Kelly, Peter Kennard, Tony Lewis,  Takis Kanellos, Vahid Khoshkham Kermanshahi, Abdullah Khoshnow, Llew Kiek, Mara Kiek, Jubing Kristianto, Irfan Kurt, Laci Lakk, Hugo Leal, Libidorr Jazz Band, Zulfu Livanelli, Andonis Maratos,  Mania Maratou, Linda Marr, Pape Mbaye, Con Marankozidis, John Napier, Aziz N’Diaye, Tuna Otenel, Vassiliki Papageorgiou, Eylem Pelit,  Rafly,  Ron Reeves, Mark Robson, Theodoris Rellos, Ashok Roy, Greg Sheahan, Bobby Singh, Christopher Soulos, Simeon Shterev, Sono Seni,  Bale Stojcevski, Davood Tabrizi,  Okay Temiz, Traiche Todoroski, Totok Tewel, Birol Topaloglu, Ubiet, Wendy Upjohn, Robbie Varga, Carlos Villanueva,  Damian Wright and Metin Yilmaz”

…and to those who taught me the arcane arts of reed-making, including Haydar Kekec, Adem Ceylan, Linsey Pollak and Risto Todoroski”

– Kim Sanders

Kim has  lectured and conducted workshops and at Bahcesehir Universitesi (Istanbul), the Chinese Central Conservatorium (Beijing) the Institut Seni Indonesia (Bandung, Solo, Jogjakarta),  Rumah Nusantara and other cultural institutions in Indonesia. In Australia he has tought at the Australian Film, Television and Radio Schoool, the NSW Conservatorium of Music, Sydney University, University of Western Sydney, Monash University, University of New England and Northern Rivers University and at many festivals in Indonesia and Australia. He designed and performed multicultural programmes in primary and secondary schools with Musica Viva and Victorian, Queensland and Northern Territory Arts Councils. He was co-author of Resources Kit book accompanying Nakisa’s work in schools with Musica Viva.

 

Links

Kim’s Facebook Page (Kim Sanders World Music) is http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kim-Sanders-World-Music/131697043563700?sk=wall

Links to Kim on Youtube include:

Kim with Birol Topaloglu at the Gitar Cafe in Istanbul

(When googling ‘gaida’ in Turkish contexts, spell it ‘gayda’ – that’s the Turkish spelling. Sometimes in Macedonia it is spelled ‘gajda’. Or, if you are set up for Cyrillic, use the relevant one)

Kim Sanders and Friends at Chapel by the Sea May 08.

With Persian group Chang-e-Nahid at the 800th anniversary of Persian mystic Rumi. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-Jyt-M8znQPrilepsko Oro on Macedonian gaida http://www.youtube.com/user/kimsandersmusic?blend=3&ob=5Greek song “Yiourgia” on Macedonian gaida http://www.youtube.com/user/kimsandersmusic?blend=3&ob=5#p/u/2/EjI3KQFpyTQMacedonian/Thracian dance paidushko (pajdusko) http://www.youtube.com/user/kimsandersmusic?blend=3&ob=5#p/u/3/OWSoRRygh5s

 

www.neyzen.com

has published a composition of Kim’s at  http://www.neyzen.com/nota_arsivi/02_klasik_eserler/078_saba/saba_ss_kim_sanders.pdf

and now has  included his  biog information on  http://www.neyzen.com/ozgecmisler/04_merhum_neyzenler/kim_sanders__merhum_ney_zen.pdf.

The above site is full of information, in Turkish and English, for the ney player or enthusiast.  (Linda Dawson)

 

 

Resources

* “Rifat Varol is an excellent “ney-opener” (ney-maker) in Sultanahmet, Istanbul . I have several of his neys. Rifat doesn’t speak English himself but does have a website (in English) which has some very good downloadable samples of ney taksims and useful links. Online ordering available. www.neyneva.com Email: neyneva@neyneva.com

* Another excellent ney maker whose neys I have also used is Hanefi Kirgiz , also in Sultanahmet, Istanbul . He speaks a little English. His website is in Turkish only: www.hanefikirgiz.com Email: info@hanefikirgiz.com

* Mehmet Yucel is also a reputable ney-opener, and has a very good ney site, including downloadable samples, charts (select “nota arsivi” from menu at top of homepage) and ney care hints. http://www.neyzen.com He is in the process of making an English-language version – some pages only at present. My composition Saba Saz Semai is published here.

www.neysazi.com(Turkish only) also has a good sheet music archive.

Ahmet Kaya: Ney Metodu

* My ney teacher Neyzen Ahmet Kaya has a new edition of his published a how-to-play-ney book Ney Metodu (in Turkish). Available online from http://www.kitapyurdu.com/kitap/default.asp?id=592706 (website in Turkish only).*

* My kaval teacher Sinan Celik  is the force behind Duygu Muzik, who put out some interesting CDs (not just kaval). They also sell good kavals made by Ali Acar.  Sinan has also written a Kaval Metodu (how-to-play kaval) in Turkish. www.dilsizkaval.com has some instruction videos in Turkish. Email: info@dilsizkaval.com

* Linsey Pollak makes very good gaidas, zurnas etc – but there’s a bit of a waiting-list. He has also published an excellent book of Macedonian tunes he has collected during his travels. It goes from simple tunes in 2/4 right up to 25/8, and isn’t full of mistakes like some “folkloric” publications! He also has a CD Kniga Tservena containing (some of) the tunes in the book. linsey@spiderweb.com.au

Risto Todoroski

* Risto Todoroski  (in Sydney) makes good Macedonian and Bulgarian gaidas, kavals and tapans. http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=310B59B0583F898A Email: sirulsko@gmail.com Tel: 02 9835 4732

Cory Dale of Brisbane also makes good gaidas, kavals and other goodies.  I can recommend him, too.

Ian Mackenzie (of Blackheath, NSW) makes Uillean, Spanish, Highland and Lowland pipes, kavals and other things. He made the chanter for the aardvark. simack_2000@yahoo.com

* Sabahattin Akdagcik is no longer performing, but is still teaching at his music school SASOM in Sydney . Turkish and Arabic folk and classical, vocal and instrumental, all levels. He is an excellent teacher. Tel 0419 707 743

* For CDs of Turkish music, Kalan Muzik is an excellent record company. All kinds of music – excellent archival stuff as well as contemporary. Online ordering. Artists include Birol Topaloglu, Selim Sesler, Osman Aktas, Yansimalar, Engin Arslan. Site is in English and Turkish. Doublemoon also put out some good stuff, mostly contemporary.  Artists include Selim Sesler, Husnu Senlendirici. Beyza Muzik & Yapim also put out some good stuff including recordings by ney master Saddrettin Ozcemi.

Songul Karahasanoglu-Ata

* Songül Karahasanoglu, my mey teacher (and Professor at Turkish Music State Conservatory in Istanbul ) has published a how-to-play-mey book (in Turkish): Mey ve Metodu (Inkilap Kitabevi, Yayin Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S.,
Ankara Cad. No 95, Sirkeci 34410, Istanbul . ISBN975-10-1083-7)

Anne Hildyard and Rob Bester (of Xenos) have published Gajda Tunes of Macedonia, a book of gaida tunes they collected in Northern Greece – good stuff. www.xenosmusic.com

www.maqamworld.com Arabic music site in English including introductory explanation of maqam system

* The only book on Arabic music in English I know is Habib Hassan Touma: The Music of the Arabs (New Expanded Edition 1996. Amadeus Press, Reinhard G. Pauly General Editor, Portland, Oregon. ISBN 0-931340-88-8).  I am not an expert on Arabic Classical music – feedback from someone who is would be appreciated.

http://www.duduk.com/ has useful info on duduk.  I can’t personally vouch for their products – feedback, anyone?

* For baglama, oud and other stringed instruments I can recomment Yusuf Toraman of Istanbul, an old friend and master instrument-maker. He made a lot of Arf Sag’s instruments. His website is in Turkish only:  http://www.toramanmuzik.com Adress: Toraman Muzik Evi San Tic. STI., Kucuk Langa Cad. Yuruk Palas No 40/3, Aksaray – Istanbul.  Tel: 0 212 589 5858/530 1616

* I have started using a Turkish music-writing programme called Mus2.  It has capacity to notate Turkish Classical and folk styles as well as other microtonal pieces. It is fairly user-friendly (if you know something about these kinds of music) and isn’t cluttered up by all kinds of features you neither want nor need.  It isn’t perfect – what is? — but they are working on improving it, and, even more importantly, their email support are friendly and helpful. (I am sick of people rushing out programmmes that don’t work properly, and who seem to lose interest in you once you have paid your money.  Case in point: the Desktop version of iTabla, whose manual did not work when I got the programme, and told me they were “too busy” to fix it – or help me with my problems!)

The Mus2 people have also released Mus2okur.  This is a prog which outlines the basics of Turkish music – makam, usul (rhythm) and other elements as well as various archives.  You can, eg, play along with a score displayed on the screen. It has its limitations – the sounds are pitched at theoretical levels, rather than those used by master musicians (so you still need a teacher, I’m afraid!) but certainly extremely useful.

You can download a trial version of both programmes (with limitations on saving etc) from their website www.mus2.com.tr. Price is very reasonable.

Music of the World are a new organization putting on World Music concerts and workshops in the Blue Mountains area. They are very supportive of Australian performers.

– Kim Sanders